Juvenile Justice Project

The Edge Project was an initiative of Global Kids, Inc., funded by the MacArthur Foundation. It aimed to expand the capacity of civic and cultural institutions to use digital media as innovative educational platforms that engage youth in learning and promote youth civic participation.


More specifically, the Edge Project was interested in civic and cultural institutions bringing cutting-edge digital media into their youth educational programs. It was equally interested in where this type of programming can be a disruptive force challenging the educators and/or the institutional cultural to work on the edge of their comfort level.


At the end of the day, we wanted to better understand the following question: How do institutions find their balance working on this edge?


Global Kids' Edge Projects explored this and other questions over two years (2009-2011) through a series of short-term educational programs developed and implemented in partnership with a variety of national civic and cultural institutions that are exemplars within their communities of practice:

 

  • The Charlotte Mecklenburg Library (Charlotte, NC)
  • Dane County Jail (Madison, WI)
  • The Field Museum (Chicago, IL)
  • Jail North (Charlotte, NC)
  • Madison Public Library (Madison, WI)
  • MOUSE (NY, NY)
  • The Museum For African Art (NY, NY)
  • The New York Public Library (NY, NY)
  • The Noguchi Museum (NY, NY)
  • The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (Washington, D.C.)

This report will offer the following:

Join the uCreate Working Example AND Worked Example Conversation 

As many of you know, our work on a range of Edge Projects, funded by the MacArthur Foundation, supports civic and cultural institutions to more effectively use digital media for learning (DML). It trains the youth educators to work on the edge or, more to the point, on their edge.

These edges are explored after each project in a new technique called Worked Examples. There are now two sites, still in development, offering examples. One is more focused on the lead up to the final piece and about connecting projects with each other - called Working Examples - while the second is like a final report - Worked Examples. Of course, these Examples are not reports at all - they are more like works in progress to understand a DML intervention from the inside out: pick one programmatic design decision then explore what that decisions can tell us about how digital media can be used for learning. Something like that.

Here is a brief overview of the questions being asked in our first Edge Project Worked Example:

In the News: Extending Collaborative Learning to Incarcerated Youth 

The latest issue of the Youth Media Reporter focuses on New Media & Technology and features an article on our uCreate project

Global Kids uCreate Project: Extending Collaborative Learning to Incarcerated Youth in Two Cities

What can young people learn from reflecting on their own learning experiences, from becoming equipped with the power to not just share what they know but how they came to know it? Why are these skills particularly relevant in our emerging digital age where knowing how to tap collective knowledge can be as important as spending time learning on one’s own?

Introducing the Edge Project 

“To transform the core, start at the edge.” -- John Hagel and John Seely Brown

The Edge Project is part of Global Kids recent support from the MacArthur Foundation to expand the capacity of civic and cultural institutions to use new media as innovative educational platforms that engage youth in learning and promote youth civic participation. More specifically, the Edge Project is interested in civic and cultural institutions bringing cutting edge digital media into their youth educational programs. It is equally interested in where this type of programming - due to technology, its pedagogical implications or both - is a disruptive force challenging the educators and/or the institutional cultural to work on the edge of their comfort level. There is a balancing act they must undertake, being receptive to how new media challenges their current educational culture and practice while, in turn, challenging the educational potential of new media through interacting with that very culture and practice. At the end of the day, we want to better understand the following questions: how do institutions find their balance working on this edge and do different types of institutions respond in different ways?