Passport to Nigeria

Passport to Nigeria was a collaboration between Global Kids' Online Leadership Program and the Museum for African Art.  Passport to Nigeria was designed to engage youth in an in-depth exploration of the arts, cultures, and history of Nigeria through an interdisciplinary and hands-on approach.  Students explored history, visual arts, dance, music, and food traditions, and covered concepts such as how art can draw from cultural sources and be a reflection of one’s values and traditions, and how art and music are powerful forms of expression, especially in times of oppression. Students gained a broad understanding of Nigeria, made connections to their own lives, and used digital media in a variety of ways, including research and reflection. After each session, students video blogged about their experiences and reflected on what they learn. At the end of the program, youth produced a video to share with their peers and communities.

The Edge Project was an initiative of Global Kids, Inc., funded by the MacArthur Foundation. It aimed to expand the capacity of civic and cultural institutions to use digital media as innovative educational platforms that engage youth in learning and promote youth civic participation.


More specifically, the Edge Project was interested in civic and cultural institutions bringing cutting-edge digital media into their youth educational programs. It was equally interested in where this type of programming can be a disruptive force challenging the educators and/or the institutional cultural to work on the edge of their comfort level.


At the end of the day, we wanted to better understand the following question: How do institutions find their balance working on this edge?


Global Kids' Edge Projects explored this and other questions over two years (2009-2011) through a series of short-term educational programs developed and implemented in partnership with a variety of national civic and cultural institutions that are exemplars within their communities of practice:

 

  • The Charlotte Mecklenburg Library (Charlotte, NC)
  • Dane County Jail (Madison, WI)
  • The Field Museum (Chicago, IL)
  • Jail North (Charlotte, NC)
  • Madison Public Library (Madison, WI)
  • MOUSE (NY, NY)
  • The Museum For African Art (NY, NY)
  • The New York Public Library (NY, NY)
  • The Noguchi Museum (NY, NY)
  • The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (Washington, D.C.)

This report will offer the following:

Final Session of Passport to Nigeria  

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group%20pic_small.jpg Passport to Nigeria, a collaboration between Global Kids and the Museum for African Art, ended last week with a bang. For the past seven weeks, students learned about the history, culture, music, and art of Nigeria through lively discussions, interactive workshops, and guest artists and examined the following themes:

- Art can draw from cultural sources and be a reflection of one’s cultural traditions and values.
- Art and music is a powerful form of expression, especially in times of oppression.
- Art and music can be bridge for understanding other cultures of the world.

Students also learned about different forms of blogging and recorded video blogs after each session. This all culminated in a final celebration that included delicious home-cooked Nigerian food (a lot of it!) and a screening of students’ final videos.

Passport to Nigeria Begins! 

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(left) Torso of a king. Wunmonije Compound, Ife. Early-mid-16th century C.E. Copper alloy. © National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria. Photo courtesy Museum for African Art/Fundación Botín. (right) Head with crown. Wunmonije Compound, Ife. 14th-early 15th century C.E. Copper alloy. © National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria. Photo courtesy Museum for African Art/Fundación Botín. (Photos: Karin L. Willis)

Last week was the beginning of “Passport to Nigeria,” a program in partnership with the Museum for African Art that explores the country of Nigeria using the Museum’s exhibition and education-related materials as well as digital media.