NYC Haunts

Global Kids has formed a partnership with The New York Public Library to start the NYC Haunts program. NYC Haunts is a program funded by the Hive NYC Learning Network in which students from the Bronx, Staten Island and Manhattan design and create location-based games using mobile technology and the ARIS platform. In NYC Haunts, the player takes on the role of a ghost detective who encounters the local residents who haunt the community until their issues can be resolved. The games are designed to be played in and around city libraries and will teach its players about the library collection, local history and global issues.

Summer of Haunts, Wrapping Up 

Last week, Global Kids celebrated the addition of two new youth-created geolocative games to our NYC Haunts portfolio, capping off a busy summer.

 

At The Point Community Development Corporation, participants in the Summer Youth Employment Program created a moving, emotional game that honors the African-American and Native American slaves that were buried hundreds of years ago in what is now Drake Park. Youth were motivated to take action through the creation of a game for change, when they observed that white land and slave owners were recognized with well-manicured and marked plots in the park, while the remains of slaves were scattered throughout the park in unmarked graves. 

 


Sheila, second from left, helps three playtesters from The Point access the game on the TaleBlazer app to begin their journey. 

 

In the game, the player must learn and remember the stories of several slave-ghosts in order to reunite them with important objects. In doing so, the player recognizes these individuals' memories and roles in history:

 

 

 

In an alternate pathway, a player must guide a young escaping slave to a safehouse, following clues in the environment, as slaves would have done following the Underground Railroad in the past.

 

 

One Week Challenge! NYC Haunts at Exposure Camp 

This summer, Global Kids is teaming up with three Hive Learning Network partners around New York City to run Global Kids' signature location-based game program, NYC Haunts. As we serve diverse populations and adjust to new settings, we are also stretching, growing, and adapting our curriculum to prepare for a roll-out of the program across multiple Global Kids school sites in the Fall.

 

The first stop was Exposure Camp, a program that guides teenagers from the Mt. Vernon and north Bronx areas to create and program their own digital content.

 

Alora Cholette, an Adelphi University Community Fellow working with GK OLP for the summer, provides her reflections from the field:

 

Efficiency was the name of the game at Exposure Camp. Students were faced with the challenge of designing a location-based game in just one week! Boy did they step up to the task.

 

 

Taking inspiration from their own experiences and those of local idols, the students created a game about a young boy named Patrick. Newly arrived to Mt. Vernon, Patrick is afraid to explore the area because of rumors he's heard about its reputation. However, he has dreams of becoming a famous rapper, which aren't going anywhere with him stuck inside.

 

Suddenly, the ghost of Mt. Vernon hip hop artist, Heavy D, appears and sends Patrick on a journey to get to the local festival Arts on 3rd. On the way, Patrick has to help other Mt. Vernon celebrities in order to collect Heavy D's song lyrics, which talk about the pride the rapper has in his neighborhood.

 

 

In order to make the game, the students kept up an energetic pace for 5 days of intensive game design. We started by brainstorming basic elements, which developed into interesting in-depth conversations about how perceptions from outside can effect how we see ourselves from within a culture.

 

Specific topics came up as we explored the neighborhood and researched its history. The students wanted to focus on how a game could be used to improve their surroundings.

 

 

Once the idea of local entertainers and artists became our focus, we moved on to testing paper prototypes, and coding the final product. 

 

Creativity was in the air and their level of engagement within the tight timeframe was impressive and a joy to be a part of!

 

 

Special thanks to the Hive Learning Network, Exposure Camp, the New York Community Trust, and the New York Public Library for their support of this project.

 

Youth Game Designers Shine at Emoti-Con 

This weekend, 16 students from 5 programs represented Global Kids at Hive's annual Emoti-Con youth digital media challenge!

 

 

Participants in GK's NYC Haunts program from the School for Human Rights and the High School for Global Citizenship showed off the location-based games they had made about local and global social issues.

 

Lyndon, Shavonne, and Jania of HSGC watch as a playtester at Emoti-Con tries out "Life as a First in the Field," their game about Jackie Robinson's experiences with racism and discrimination.

 

Playing for Keeps students from the Citywide program and at Global Neighborhood Secondary School presented games for change they had made using Scratch and Gamestar Mechanic.

 


Malak and Aya (right) from GNSS present their game to two students who said they could identify with the challenges faced by the player character, a young immigrant.

 

All of our students -- whether they came to present or just to be attentive, curious audience members -- truly shined.

 

Special shout out to Payton (a 6th grader) and Keron (an 8th grader) from School for Human Rights who impressed the judges with their presentations about the location-based game they made with their peers about gun violence, Keep Wingate Safe. They placed in the top 5 and stood on stage in front of over 200 people to talk about their work! They took away badges for Point of View and Most Social Impact.

 

 

We would like to thank all of the Global Kids trainers, the NYC Hive Learning Network, the Emoti-Con Steering Committee, and the judges, and keynotes who made this day possible.

 

Playtesting Haunts 2014 Treks 

You don't need a time machine to experience the past. That's what students at the High School for Global Citizenship and the School for Human Rights found out this semester as they created their own location-based games for GPS devices that drew on local history and made connections to larger global issues, such as protection of the right to equality before the law, as stated in Article 7 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

 

Stroll down to the housing complex across the street from Jackie Robinson School in Crown Heights with your cell phone or tablet and load up the TaleBlazer app. By playing the student-produced game, you'll learn that if you were at that spot five decades ago, you would have seen Ebbet's Field-- the Brooklyn Dodgers home baseball field where Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball. Playing as Jackie Robinson, you'll be faced with racist, dehumanizing situations as you visit all four bases of the baseball diamond and attempt to score a home run. You must make decisions in character. As is noted in the game, Jackie Robinson is just one of many who faced discrimination on the basis of race over the years. Article 7 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights protects people around the world from such unlawful treatment by ensuring that "all are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law." 

 
On the day of the final playtest, student game-designers presented their game in front of their peers and staff from Global Kids and the Brooklyn Public Library.
They discussed game play, the game design process, and some of the challenges they faced in designing the game.
 

NYC Haunts Goes to Philly! 

See if you can solve this riddle about a famous historical landmark in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: It was used to bring the people together to hear of their new country. Once it was strong; now it sits in disrepair.

What is it? 

 

Still not sure? It's the Liberty Bell! 

 

Answers to riddles like this and other triva questions about some fascinating historical landmarks were answered by thirty-seven Freshmen from Long Island City (LIC) High School who participated in a Global Kids field trip to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There, we toured the campuses of University of Pennsylvania and Temple University, but we also checked out some historical landmarks by playing a geo-locative game on TaleBlazer using smartphones and tablets.

 

 

During the two weeks leading up to the trip, a number of LIC students contributed to the development, design, and research of a TaleBlazer game in which the ghost of Benjamin Franklin leads players around sites located in Washington Square Park, Independence National Historical Park, and Franklin Square. In order to move through each park, players have to answer riddles and questions about each landmark presented by Mr. Franklin. By answering correctly, Franklin awards players with pennies because, as he always says, "A penny saved is a penny earned." Some noteable sites include the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the Liberty Bell, and Benjamin Franklin's Burial Site.  

Around NYC, Haunts Games Blossom this Spring 

What would Jackie Robinson say to the people who currently live on site of the field where he broke the color line in major league baseball? 

 

How did a Queens mobster contribute to the history of Long Island City?

 

How did people react to shootings that happened in Wingate Park in 1997?

 

These are just some of the questions being pondered by youth game designers at the School for Human Rights, Long Island City High School and the High School for Global Citizenship as Global Kids' NYC Haunts program kicks into high gear.

 

At HSGC, students have decided to situate their geo-locative game on the site of what was Ebbet's Field, where the famous Brooklyn Dodgers played baseball decades ago. Students are channelling the "spirits" of the players who supported and those who were reluctant to support Jackie Robinson as he became the first African-American to play on a major league team.

 

 

They have been making decisions about their game's structure, determining that players will walk around the site, collecting virtual baseball cards each time they make key decisions related to Jackie Robinson's experiences. They are also using the "land mines" functionality of the TaleBlazer program to insert what they are calling "trap cards," random agents that will attempt to steal pre-earned cards.

 

 

NYC Haunts at Long Island City High School in Queens kicked off in early March where students shared their best ghost stories and paranormal experiences. The conversation eventually shifted to a discussion about this history of the Long Island City and Astoria neighborhoods. Students wracked their brains, trying to think of some cool historical facts about the area, but quickly referred to Wikipedia as they realized they had some serious fact-finding to do. They learned that Frank Costello, one of the most infamous mob bosses in American history, was buried in Astoria. This and many other great historical questions are being considered for LIC Haunts' geo-locative game concept.

 

Players of the game being created by SHR middle school students will have the opportunity to walk around Wingate Park collecting the testimonies of witnesses and victims of distant and recent gun crimes to raise awareness about this issue in their neighborhood and to provide safety tips and ideas for solutions.

 

First, participants brainstormed topics and ideas for their games:

 

 

After picking a topic, they did some research with educators from the Brooklyn Public Library to collect stories and ideas.

 

 

Inspired by the articles, their own experiences and perspectives, they created characters and created a trajectory around the playground for the player to navigate.

 

 

Most recently, they used a paper prototype to showcase and refine their ideas.

 

 

With just a few weeks left to the school year, students will be finishing up their prototypes and will start coding and playtesting their games. We are excited to share them with our communities!

 

NYC Haunts, Now at a GK School Near You! 

What stories does your neighborhood have to tell?

 

Global Kids is excited to announce that NYC Haunts -- our signature program where youth create a mobile, augmented reality game exploring local history and contemporary issues -- is blasting out to three Global Kids schools this Spring! In a pilot project supported by the Hive Learning Network NYC and the New York Community Trust, students at the School for Human Rights in Brooklyn, the High School for Global Citizenship, and Long Island City High School are creating geo-locative games and helping GK educators experiment with and stretch the NYC Haunts curriculum in advance of a roll out at several Global Kids schools next Fall. 

 

Hive partner organizations the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Exposure Camp, and The Point will also host Haunts pilots this Summer.

 

 

In addition to iterating on past versions of the program conducted in collaboration with the New York and Brooklyn Public Libraries, this year's pilot will test out a new augmented-reality game design engine, TaleBlazer, currently being developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Researchers and software developers at MIT are closely supporting the program to help Global Kids learn all of the features of the program and help measure student learning outcomes.

 

The games, which will follow the footsteps of a ghost detective, will engage both game designers and players. Designers create a digital trek through a neighborhood, dropping in clues such as audio clips, videos, and photos, to help solve the mystery and uncover the neighborhood’s history. Youth research the ghost’s story, the social, environmental, or economic conditions in the city that might have caused its demise, and imagine the steps players can take to help the ghost move on and cease its haunting. In the process, youth learn to research and curate content to help other youth understand the plight of the ghost, explore contemporary issues or a particular moment in neighborhood history and develop their digital media, critical thinking, and communications skills. 

 


Kylan and Angel, from left, middle schoolers at School for Human Rights, play a location-based game created by Tommy, right, and his classmates at School for International Studies this past summer. Angel and Kylan will create their own game this spring.

 

We'd also love to share a poem written by Angel (pictured above) after playing a first example location-based game with our NYC Haunts program this January. Enjoy!

Today was another average day at GK.
We made a change and saved the Day.
We used our androids our feet and more
To help a dad and drop the ball
The dad we help lost his dog bacon
When we were done home he was taken
I love location based game
because we move around to get to our aim
meet us next time to learn and see more
and be apart of GK down to the core

- Angel, Age 14

NYC Haunts: Week 2 

Our SIS students are officially GPS game designers! This week was packed with activities all leading up to a presentation at the Weeksville Heritage Center where students from the School for Human Rights playtested the new game. 

 

There was lots of work to do to prepare. On the 5th day of the program, students split up into groups to work on developing characters for the game. They referred back to the history they learned at the Weeksville Heritage Center and week 1 workshops. They decided what roles to give each character and the items each character would give to the player, and began writing the characters' dialogues. At the end of the day they presented their character's dialogues, even dressing up a bit and playing the part. They each shared what worked and what needed improvement about the other groups' dialogues and provided strong feedback for their peers.

 

Robert in costume and reading the dialogue of the Freedman Reggie Colson

 

On the 6th day, the students revised the rough draft of the dialogue in groups, adding more historical context and even some 1800's slang. Their creativity was put to the test! At the end of the day the students connected the Draft Riots to other modern social issues of their choosing: the Trayvon Martin case, hate crimes, and the work of Malcolm X were the three topics students were most interested in exploring. 

 

Students adding more historical context and content to their dialogues.

 

Jayme and Julisa do research on a modern day social issue connected to their game.

 

On the 7th day, they finalized their dialogues and put the last minute touches on their game. They playtested their game in the office using the quicktravel option on ARIS. Content with the results of their finalized game, they began preparing to present their game at the Weeksville Heritage Center the following day. They learned to keep in mind things such as eye contact, pace of speech, volume of speech, and body posture. They were very encouraging and supportive of each other when practicing their speeches giving feedback and constructive criticism when necessary.

 

Students relating the Draft Riots to racism and hate crimes today.

 

Finally, the big day had arrived! The students traveled to the Weeksville Heritage Center where they presented their game to middle schoolers from the School for Human Rights. They talked about the Civil War, Draft Riots, connections between that time and current day issues, and how to use ARIS. When it came time to play the game, they became leaders, helping other students easily maneuver through the game, despite the heat wave! They made some new friends and enjoyed playing the game they worked for two weeks to create.

At the Weeksville Heritage Center playing the game created by SIS students

 

NYC Haunts was a great experience for both the students and the facilitators. Thanks in part to one of the funders on the project, TimeWarner Cable, the students were exposed to something they were not familiar with before and were able to successfully create a game that others could play and learn from. The students also became more comfortable with each other and made new friends along the way. It was an enriching experience that I could see the students wanting to do again.

NYC Haunts at School for International Studies: Week 1 

Thanks to a generous grant from TimeWarner CableOLP's 2013 NYC Haunts summer camp is up and running! Middle School students from the School for International Studies came together this week to begin designing a geo-locative game set during the Civil War draft riots in the free African-American neighborhood of Weeksville in Brooklyn.

 

We kicked off the week with a scavenger hunt in Madison Square Park to learn the fundamentals of location-based games: map reading. Students also enjoyed using the iPads to play their first geo-locative game.

 

Kenny, Niles, and Robert taking a picture near the Shake Shack, one of the locations in the scavenger hunt.

 

On the second day of camp, students were introduced to the ARIS game design platform's editor where they practiced putting characters and items on a map and creating their own basic ARIS games. They also learned about the Civil War draft riots that took place in New York City exactly 150 years ago. Each student played a character from the time of the draft riots and made decisions based on who their character was and what they had in their "inventories." 

 

Julisa, Tommy, and Robert playing the Survive the Draft game created by OLP staff and interns Man Cheung and Melissa Salama.

 

On the third day, the students visited the Weeksville Heritage Center and gathered ideas for characters and locations that could be used in their ARIS game. They learned about how residents of Weeksville might have been affected by the Civil War draft riots.

 

On the fourth day, students learned that the story in their game would be strong if it included some emotional ups and downs. They picked stories or movies they enjoyed and broke them down to see how the characters' emotions changed, then they brainstormed potential mysteries for their game, identifying characters and locations based on their visit to the Weeksville Heritage Center the day before. Each student contributed to the storyline, excited to see it all come together.

 

Jayme and Julisa presenting their ideas for the game's storyline.

 

Next week brings a whole new set of game design activites based on what students learned this week. It's crunch time: the final playtesting day is next Thursday!