MS 391

Global Kids at the Angelo Patri Middle School 

After three amazing years our time at MS 391, the Angelo Patri Middle school has come to an end. We wanted to celebrate with a look back to some of the highlights over the years including; the inception of NYC Haunts, creating anti-bullying comics, developing amazing games and most of all - having fun while learning. Check out the slideshow and celebrate our incredible students from the Bronx!

 

 

MS 391 - Bullying, Gaming and Coding 

Global Kids Leaders at MS 391 have been working hard learning elements of games, basics of coding HTML and discussing social issues. 

 

In our Game Design program students play tested SimSweatshop, a game that puts players in the shoes of factory workers attempting to make sneakers. As time accumulated they saw how their energy levels would quickly deplete, the small amount of money they accumulated, and how their overall quality of life was affected. During our debrief students shared facts about child labor and related it back to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. They also discussed the mechanics of the game and whether it got the message across to the players. We continued our talk of games using Gamestar Mechanic's basic element cards. Youth played a matching game to learn game design vocabulary. 

 

Coby, Julio and Anthony matching photos to terms. 

 

Middle Schoolers Learning Gaming and Web Design 

In our third year at the Angelo Patri Middle School MS 391 in the Bronx, we have introduced two new programs into the curriculum.

 

On Mondays we began the Global Kids Playing 4 Keeps program in which students are learning the fundementals of game design and will eventually develop a serious game on a global issue. Our first session had students exploring what makes iconic characters by drawing and presenting some of their own favorites. 

 

GK Leaders Chris and Lexington drawing a character from World of Warcraft.

 

GK Leaders Collins, Jose and Coby present their drawing from Avatar. 

 

GK Leaders Jose and JD present their characters from Super Mario. 

 

NYC Haunts Featured on Infinite Thinking Machine 

In their season premier, online show Infinite Thinking Machine focused on games based learning and highlighted NYC Haunts, Global Kids' collaborative project with the NYPL. The full episode is below and discusses other great tools frequently used by Global Kids such as Minecraft and Gamestar Mechanic. Special thanks to HP for Education who first made us aware of the feature!

 

 


 

Emoti-Con! Recap - Design Challenge and Presentations 

This past June brought us Emoti-Con! 2012 Digital Youth Media Festival. Check out below two short videos showcasing the design challenge and the competition presentations that happened over the course of the day. 

 

 

 

Out-of-School Settings Create Climate for New Skills 

 

Education Week featured a story which highlighted our Race to the White House and NYC Haunts programs. Read the full story below. 

 

 

Osarieman Igbinevbo, 17, right, and her teammate, Miguel Zeng, 18, discover a geocache inside a disused Fire Department call box in New York City. The Global Kids program uses the treasure hunt and technology to teach students about public-policy issues.
—Emile Wamsteker for Education Week

 

 

Educators see them as learning labs

 

Emoti-Con! 2012 

Without hesitation everyone involved agreed that this year's Emoti-Con! was the BEST EVER! We saw over 150 youth bring their energy and a-game as they set up the projects they worked so hard on over the course of the year. The diversity of mediums ranged from film, scratch, projects using arduino boards, geolocative gaming, robotics and so much more. Youth heard from four amazing keynote speakers including: Mike Edwards, software engineer at The Huffington Post; Ayah Bdeir, founder of littleBits.cc; Jeffrey Yohalem, lead writer of Assasin's Creed: Brotherhood; and Naveen Selvadurai, co-founder of foursquare. 

 

Global Kids represented with three projects including the Playing for Peace Challenge, NYC Haunts, and the debut of Cut It Out a documentary made by GK Leaders at Long Island City H.S. on truancy. 

 

Taking home crowd favorite was a team from MOUSE who developed Dining Bands. These bands worn on the wrist were to aid the visually impaired while dining. They would vibrate near food to let its user know where it was and had a sensor for temperature to warn the user when their food was too hot. 

 

Overall, the day was a great success and we will have many more videos and photos to share. For now feel free to check out the gallery thus far and watch a brief reflection from two NYC Haunts youth who attended the festival. GK Leader Paoly said it best as she summed up her thoughts:

 

GK's OLP Youth Leaders at the GK Annual Youth Conference 

Youth from two GK OLP programs -  NYC Haunts and Playing 4 Keeps - attended and presented at the 2012 Annual Youth Conference. Below are some photos show their awesome work and good times that were had.

 

 

 

 


Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.

 

Great Poe Park Mystery game launch - NYC Haunts 

Global Kids Youth Leaders launched the location based game they created using the platform ARIS. The game is the first on a series of games developed in collaboration with The New York Public Library and as part of the NYC Haunts program. The game which takes place in the Fordham area of the Bronx, is about a detective that must solve the mystery of a missing child. It was presented to other youth from the Fordham Library branch. The game deals with local history of the Bronx, with the author Edgar Allan Poe, and civic action around the issue of clean air. 

 

See the video for more details:

video: 
See video

NYC Haunts Video now LIVE  

It can be hard to explain what a geolocative iPod game is, so we at Global Kids are just THRILLED that our partners at the New York Public Library put this awesome video together documenting the launch of NYC Haunts, the community-based game created by GK youth leaders to be used by their peers at their local Bronx library.

Here is how the NYPL describes it: