NYC Haunts

NYC Haunts, Now at a GK School Near You! 

What stories does your neighborhood have to tell?

 

Global Kids is excited to announce that NYC Haunts -- our signature program where youth create a mobile, augmented reality game exploring local history and contemporary issues -- is blasting out to three Global Kids schools this Spring! In a pilot project supported by the Hive Learning Network NYC and the New York Community Trust, students at the School for Human Rights in Brooklyn, the High School for Global Citizenship, and Long Island City High School are creating geo-locative games and helping GK educators experiment with and stretch the NYC Haunts curriculum in advance of a roll out at several Global Kids schools next Fall. 

 

Hive partner organizations the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Exposure Camp, and The Point will also host Haunts pilots this Summer.

 

 

In addition to iterating on past versions of the program conducted in collaboration with the New York and Brooklyn Public Libraries, this year's pilot will test out a new augmented-reality game design engine, TaleBlazer, currently being developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Researchers and software developers at MIT are closely supporting the program to help Global Kids learn all of the features of the program and help measure student learning outcomes.

 

The games, which will follow the footsteps of a ghost detective, will engage both game designers and players. Designers create a digital trek through a neighborhood, dropping in clues such as audio clips, videos, and photos, to help solve the mystery and uncover the neighborhood’s history. Youth research the ghost’s story, the social, environmental, or economic conditions in the city that might have caused its demise, and imagine the steps players can take to help the ghost move on and cease its haunting. In the process, youth learn to research and curate content to help other youth understand the plight of the ghost, explore contemporary issues or a particular moment in neighborhood history and develop their digital media, critical thinking, and communications skills. 

 


Kylan and Angel, from left, middle schoolers at School for Human Rights, play a location-based game created by Tommy, right, and his classmates at School for International Studies this past summer. Angel and Kylan will create their own game this spring.

 

We'd also love to share a poem written by Angel (pictured above) after playing a first example location-based game with our NYC Haunts program this January. Enjoy!

Today was another average day at GK.
We made a change and saved the Day.
We used our androids our feet and more
To help a dad and drop the ball
The dad we help lost his dog bacon
When we were done home he was taken
I love location based game
because we move around to get to our aim
meet us next time to learn and see more
and be apart of GK down to the core

- Angel, Age 14

NYC Haunts: Week 2 

Our SIS students are officially GPS game designers! This week was packed with activities all leading up to a presentation at the Weeksville Heritage Center where students from the School for Human Rights playtested the new game. 

 

There was lots of work to do to prepare. On the 5th day of the program, students split up into groups to work on developing characters for the game. They referred back to the history they learned at the Weeksville Heritage Center and week 1 workshops. They decided what roles to give each character and the items each character would give to the player, and began writing the characters' dialogues. At the end of the day they presented their character's dialogues, even dressing up a bit and playing the part. They each shared what worked and what needed improvement about the other groups' dialogues and provided strong feedback for their peers.

 

Robert in costume and reading the dialogue of the Freedman Reggie Colson

 

On the 6th day, the students revised the rough draft of the dialogue in groups, adding more historical context and even some 1800's slang. Their creativity was put to the test! At the end of the day the students connected the Draft Riots to other modern social issues of their choosing: the Trayvon Martin case, hate crimes, and the work of Malcolm X were the three topics students were most interested in exploring. 

 

Students adding more historical context and content to their dialogues.

 

Jayme and Julisa do research on a modern day social issue connected to their game.

 

On the 7th day, they finalized their dialogues and put the last minute touches on their game. They playtested their game in the office using the quicktravel option on ARIS. Content with the results of their finalized game, they began preparing to present their game at the Weeksville Heritage Center the following day. They learned to keep in mind things such as eye contact, pace of speech, volume of speech, and body posture. They were very encouraging and supportive of each other when practicing their speeches giving feedback and constructive criticism when necessary.

 

Students relating the Draft Riots to racism and hate crimes today.

 

Finally, the big day had arrived! The students traveled to the Weeksville Heritage Center where they presented their game to middle schoolers from the School for Human Rights. They talked about the Civil War, Draft Riots, connections between that time and current day issues, and how to use ARIS. When it came time to play the game, they became leaders, helping other students easily maneuver through the game, despite the heat wave! They made some new friends and enjoyed playing the game they worked for two weeks to create.

At the Weeksville Heritage Center playing the game created by SIS students

 

NYC Haunts was a great experience for both the students and the facilitators. Thanks in part to one of the funders on the project, TimeWarner Cable, the students were exposed to something they were not familiar with before and were able to successfully create a game that others could play and learn from. The students also became more comfortable with each other and made new friends along the way. It was an enriching experience that I could see the students wanting to do again.

NYC Haunts at School for International Studies: Week 1 

Thanks to a generous grant from TimeWarner CableOLP's 2013 NYC Haunts summer camp is up and running! Middle School students from the School for International Studies came together this week to begin designing a geo-locative game set during the Civil War draft riots in the free African-American neighborhood of Weeksville in Brooklyn.

 

We kicked off the week with a scavenger hunt in Madison Square Park to learn the fundamentals of location-based games: map reading. Students also enjoyed using the iPads to play their first geo-locative game.

 

Kenny, Niles, and Robert taking a picture near the Shake Shack, one of the locations in the scavenger hunt.

 

On the second day of camp, students were introduced to the ARIS game design platform's editor where they practiced putting characters and items on a map and creating their own basic ARIS games. They also learned about the Civil War draft riots that took place in New York City exactly 150 years ago. Each student played a character from the time of the draft riots and made decisions based on who their character was and what they had in their "inventories." 

 

Julisa, Tommy, and Robert playing the Survive the Draft game created by OLP staff and interns Man Cheung and Melissa Salama.

 

On the third day, the students visited the Weeksville Heritage Center and gathered ideas for characters and locations that could be used in their ARIS game. They learned about how residents of Weeksville might have been affected by the Civil War draft riots.

 

On the fourth day, students learned that the story in their game would be strong if it included some emotional ups and downs. They picked stories or movies they enjoyed and broke them down to see how the characters' emotions changed, then they brainstormed potential mysteries for their game, identifying characters and locations based on their visit to the Weeksville Heritage Center the day before. Each student contributed to the storyline, excited to see it all come together.

 

Jayme and Julisa presenting their ideas for the game's storyline.

 

Next week brings a whole new set of game design activites based on what students learned this week. It's crunch time: the final playtesting day is next Thursday!

Global Kids at the Angelo Patri Middle School 

After three amazing years our time at MS 391, the Angelo Patri Middle school has come to an end. We wanted to celebrate with a look back to some of the highlights over the years including; the inception of NYC Haunts, creating anti-bullying comics, developing amazing games and most of all - having fun while learning. Check out the slideshow and celebrate our incredible students from the Bronx!

 

 

Global Kids and Hive at Grantmakers for Learning 2012 Conference 

GK Leader Brianna setting up our board.

 

Global Kids presented their Hive projects at the 2012 Grantmakers for Learning Conference Reception. GK Leader Brianna discussed her experience in the summer program Race to the White House which through the Hive Learning Network was in partnership with the Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Brianna rocking her Hive t-shirt at the Global Kids table.

 

Brianna explained what geocaching was and their process of coming up with difference electorial issues to highlight within the game. She also encouraged the Grantmakers to experience a mini-scavenger hunt during the reception and gave sticker prizes to those who completed the task. 

 

Myself and Brianna setting up the table.

(Photo credit: @_technovation_)

 

NYC Haunts Featured on Infinite Thinking Machine 

In their season premier, online show Infinite Thinking Machine focused on games based learning and highlighted NYC Haunts, Global Kids' collaborative project with the NYPL. The full episode is below and discusses other great tools frequently used by Global Kids such as Minecraft and Gamestar Mechanic. Special thanks to HP for Education who first made us aware of the feature!

 

 


 

Emoti-Con! Recap - Design Challenge and Presentations 

This past June brought us Emoti-Con! 2012 Digital Youth Media Festival. Check out below two short videos showcasing the design challenge and the competition presentations that happened over the course of the day. 

 

 

 

Out-of-School Settings Create Climate for New Skills 

 

Education Week featured a story which highlighted our Race to the White House and NYC Haunts programs. Read the full story below. 

 

 

Osarieman Igbinevbo, 17, right, and her teammate, Miguel Zeng, 18, discover a geocache inside a disused Fire Department call box in New York City. The Global Kids program uses the treasure hunt and technology to teach students about public-policy issues.
—Emile Wamsteker for Education Week

 

 

Educators see them as learning labs

 

Emoti-Con! 2012 

Without hesitation everyone involved agreed that this year's Emoti-Con! was the BEST EVER! We saw over 150 youth bring their energy and a-game as they set up the projects they worked so hard on over the course of the year. The diversity of mediums ranged from film, scratch, projects using arduino boards, geolocative gaming, robotics and so much more. Youth heard from four amazing keynote speakers including: Mike Edwards, software engineer at The Huffington Post; Ayah Bdeir, founder of littleBits.cc; Jeffrey Yohalem, lead writer of Assasin's Creed: Brotherhood; and Naveen Selvadurai, co-founder of foursquare. 

 

Global Kids represented with three projects including the Playing for Peace Challenge, NYC Haunts, and the debut of Cut It Out a documentary made by GK Leaders at Long Island City H.S. on truancy. 

 

Taking home crowd favorite was a team from MOUSE who developed Dining Bands. These bands worn on the wrist were to aid the visually impaired while dining. They would vibrate near food to let its user know where it was and had a sensor for temperature to warn the user when their food was too hot. 

 

Overall, the day was a great success and we will have many more videos and photos to share. For now feel free to check out the gallery thus far and watch a brief reflection from two NYC Haunts youth who attended the festival. GK Leader Paoly said it best as she summed up her thoughts:

 

NYC Haunts at Curtis! 

 

Curtis High School Global Kids Leaders have had a busy couple of weeks at the NYC Haunts program in collaboration with the St. George Library. At their first session youth were introduced to the program by play-testing the NYC Haunts game created by the team at the Seward Park Branch. They shared their feedback on both the game and the benefits and challenges of the ARIS system. 

 

Carli DeFillo from the Museum of the City of New York came and showcased some amazing artifacts from Staten Island as well as take the youth on a historical walking tour throughout the neighborhood.